The Weetwood Love Lottery

Here at Weetwood, we’ve been getting ready for our special Valentine’s Day events. We’ve crafted a special Valentine’s Day menu, and ordered red roses. We also thought it would be interesting to do some research into the history of this romantic day for a bit of inspiration.

During our investigations we came across a number of theories about the origins of Valentine’s Day involving a rebellious priest and a prisoner in love with his jailor’s daughter, but the story that really captured our imagination was the ancient Roman ‘love lottery’.

The Roman Love Lottery

In ancient Roman times, it was believed that the middle of February was the beginning of spring and an important time for fertility, so on the 14th of February a holiday devoted to Juno, queen of the gods and patron of marriage, was held. An important aspect of the day was the love lottery where the names of young women were picked from a bowl by young men and the resulting couple would become something of an item and would often end up getting married.

Our Version

We thought it’d be fun to do as the Romans do this Valentine’s, and have our own love lottery. The Weetwood Love Lottery, won’t be involving names on paper though, but will help our Facebook fans tap into a bit of Roman romance by entering a competition for an evening at Weetwood Hall on Saturday 11th of February. If you win, you and that special person in your life will be treated to an evening of amore; starting at the 17th Century Manor House with pre-dinner drink and canapés followed by a three course dinner and an overnight stay in one of our superior double rooms.

To enter, visit our Facebook page, like us and fill out the entry form. Good luck and happy Valentine’s Day.

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